Things I wish I believed were true

I am not fat. I have fat.


tedx:

Watch the full talk here »

Piya Sorcar, founder and CEO of TeachAIDS, teaches about HIV/AIDS in parts of the world where even local educators get the basic facts wrong — countries where the need for HIV education is vital.

Sorcar discovered that the materials themselves were the biggest problem, and she revamped them to pair accurate information with culturally acceptable images. Her results were truly impressive. Watch here »


humansofnewyork:

"It is important to maintain your equanimity. You cannot let yourself get too ‘up’ or too ‘down’ based on your circumstances." 
“Too ‘down’ I understand. But why not too ‘up?’” 
“Because the higher your mountains are, the deeper your valleys will seem. You should not react to the world. You should respond, but not react. A response is an action based on logic. A reaction is an emotional state. Your reaction will not change the world. Your reaction only changes you. Your response will change the world.”

humansofnewyork:

"It is important to maintain your equanimity. You cannot let yourself get too ‘up’ or too ‘down’ based on your circumstances."
“Too ‘down’ I understand. But why not too ‘up?’”
“Because the higher your mountains are, the deeper your valleys will seem. You should not react to the world. You should respond, but not react. A response is an action based on logic. A reaction is an emotional state. Your reaction will not change the world. Your reaction only changes you. Your response will change the world.”


tedx:

—From Chimamamda Ngozi Adiche’s TEDxEuston talk, “We should all be feminists.” Watch her entire talk below:

tedx:

—From Chimamamda Ngozi Adiche’s TEDxEuston talk, “We should all be feminists. Watch her entire talk below:



tedx:

From Amy Purdy’s TEDxOrangeCoast talk, "Living beyond limits. Amy is a professional snowboarder who lost her legs at age 19 due to bacterial meningitis. In her TEDx talk, she describes how she dealt with this loss, and encourages us to take control of our lives — and our limits.

Watch Amy’s entire talk below,
and learn more about Amy and her non-profit Adaptive Action Sports, dedicated to introducing people with physical challenges to action sports at her website.


Tiredness is an understatement.

One more day before my 21 day work stint is over.

Bring it on!!!

~Kay


(via themadeshop)


When I was 4 years old I realized that I was different: [I felt like a boy, but everyone] perceived me as a girl. I was born female. Biological female. I learned that I would never grow a penis and for that I could never change into a boy. This was one of the bitterest insights I had in my life… [Yet] I had a happy childhood. I loved to play outside and my parents were very open-minded … I had a carefree life and the little difference between my legs didn’t really matter.

But then, my puberty starts and everything started to change. My body changed [in] a direction I never wanted and I felt very alone and misunderstood. They brought me to psychiatrists, but they didn’t find out what really was going on in my head. I fought an inner, silent battle with my soul and my body…

[Eventually] I asked myself, ‘Am I really happy? Is this my life?’ No, it was not my life and I was not happy at all. I made my biggest decision in my life. I took heart and started to write letters to my friends, to my patients, and even to my colleagues, and I explained that I wanted to live as a man — not only inside, but also outside…I started hormonal therapy and my body responded very well and very fast to this treatment. After a few months I could look into the mirror and I saw my soul in my face…

Could you imagine, in this world, that people get killed because of that? Because they want to be true to themselves? It is a crime that every year hundreds of transsexual men and women have to die because they took heart to live in another gender role than the one they were assigned to at birth. Only because they look different and do not fit into the gender binary or do not fit into the categories…

I think we have to break down the taboo of transsexualism…I think we have to become visible to gain acceptance, and with acceptance we will earn understanding. And, so, I believe we can make the world a better place for all of us…

Being transsexual or transgender is not a matter of pathology, it is a matter of diversity…I found out with my visible masculinity, it is not necessary anymore to find if I’m more female or male. I finally can say, I feel as myself. I stand here in front of you because I want to encourage everybody to become true to his or her life — and to accept the truth of everybody’s life.

From Dr. Niklaus Fluetsch’s talk, “My true gender identity,” given at TEDxZug. Born biologically female, Niklaus took a leap of faith in 2007 — after years of struggle — and now lives openly as a man. For more on his story, watch his entire talk here. (via tedx)